Adastral Park
Careers & Education   >   British Science Week   >   Creative Media
Day 3: Creative Media
1 - Introduction
Meet Amelia and Alex, who will introduce you to the world of Creative Media with experts from BT and West Suffolk College:
2 - Developing Live Immersive VR for Sports with Andy Gower
Photo of Amelia Winterburn
Amelia (host): Find out how the BT team have delivered BT Sport's live 8k 360° immersive sports experience. Andy will describe key technologies such as capture and production through to delivery and presentation.
Over to you Andy....
Photo of Andy Gower
Photo of Andy Gower
Andy Gower
Head of Immersive and Interactive Content Research, BT
Key qualifications: BA (Hons) Degree in Three Dimensional Product Design
What does your job involve? I lead a diverse team of researchers who have skills in User Experience design, Software Development, Games Programming and TV Production. Together we design, develop, test and trial new innovative TV services and production technologies. It's great working with others across BT to deliver game changing customer experiences.
How did you get into your current role? During the second year of my degree studies, I applied for a 3-month summer placement at BT. After completing my degree, I then applied for a job in BT's Human Factors department. I've continued to develop new technical and people management skills that have enabled me to progress my career within BT.
What did you want to be when you were younger? I've always wanted to be a Designer – being creative is very important to me.
What do you do outside work? I spend a lot of my spare time renovating my early 1900's home… it's a never ending job!
Photo of Andy Gower
Andy: Thanks for watching my video. I hope it’s given you a great insight into cool immersive technologies! We have had some questions submitted relating to this topic in the lead up to British Science Week which are answered below. However, if you have any questions, we'd love to hear from you. Please email stemexpert@bt.com. We also held a live Q&A session on the day, a recording of which can be seen below...
Questions and answers
Question:
When will we have 16k TVs?
student profile
Photo of Andy Gower
Answer:
We’ll likely have 16k resolution TVs when wall-sized displays can be cheaply manufactured. Imagine a different type of display that can be hung like wallpaper or painted on a wall.
Question:
What other sports could you use this technology for? Are you planning to do any other sports?
student profile
Photo of Andy Gower
Answer:
BT Sport currently offers 360-degree Immersive video experiences for Football, MotoGP and Boxing. We’ve also explored how it could be used for Sailing, Rugby and other non-sports experiences such as training and recruitment.
Got a question? email stemexpert@bt.com
3 - Have a Go Activities
Photo of Alex Healing
Alex (host): Did you know that the early days of film did not involve any technology but was created using something called a Zoetrope? Shane will show you how to create your very own Zoetrope and then you can have a go at making your own animation. You can download the activity pack (link below the video) to get step by step instructions.
Download the activity pack
4 - Career profiles
Amelia Winterburn
Amelia (host): As you may imagine there are many different roles in the world of creative media including everything from research to content delivery. Take a look at some of the roles that people have at Adastral and across BT.
Photo of Roland Craigie
Photo of Roland Craigie
Roland Craigie
Senior Researcher, BT
Key qualifications: Electronic Engineering
What does your job involve? Investigation and research into multimedia systems, video and audio production, future TV production and broadcast content delivery. Special interest in Virtual Reality systems and content, focussing on 360-degree live video and multi-channel audio engineering.
How did you get into your current role? After completing school, I joined the 3-year BT Apprenticeship scheme, during which I qualified as an Electronics Engineer. My first role after graduation was in a Video and Digital Communications lab, building then designing circuit boards for various BT research projects. I moved into an IT support role and then IT Network support managing large research networks and systems. I had an interest in video production and editing so began researching video and audio communications systems and have been doing this ever since.
What did you want to be when you were younger? An inventor
What do you do outside work? I have had a life-long interest in photography; Related to this is my interest in video production and editing; I have owned personal computers since I was very young and this now links everything together for digital production of both. I am increasingly interested in music engineering and production. To balance all of this 'indoor' activity I ride motorbikes.
Photo of Jonathan Rennison
Photo of Jonathan Rennison
Jonathan Rennison
Research Specialist, BT
Key qualifications: MEng Engineering Science
What does your job involve? Research into new technologies/products/standards, development of test/trial systems and demos, patent work
How did you get into your current role? Entered via the graduate scheme, after a 3 month placement whilst at university.
What did you want to be when you were younger? To work in science/technology areas
What do you do outside work? Cycling and walking
See more career profiles...
5 - West Suffolk College: "The science of sound"
Photo of Alex Healing
Alex (host): Join West Suffolk College's Andy Guy and Oliver Bell to explore the Science of Sound. Review a live performance to identify how science is an integral part of all live performances. Explore the physics behind how a live performance is planned and delivered to an audience.
Over to you, Andy and Oliver....
Photo of Andy Guy
Photo of Andy Guy
Andy Guy
Course Director Music Technology, West Suffolk College
Key qualifications:  Bachelor of Science degree in Music Engineering Technology / member of Association of Stage Pyrotechnicians / Associate degree in Education
What does your job involve? My job involves sharing my music skills with some dedicated young people who work hard to achieve the career of their dreams
How did you get into your current role? After the education degree, I worked freelance in the music industry in the United States for 8 years, then got my degree in Music Technology and then emigrated to England.
What did you want to be when you were younger? Rock star
What do you do outside work? I am a recording artist and a music producer and an occasional live events technician
Photo of Oliver Bell
Photo of Oliver Bell
Oliver Bell
Lecturer at West Suffolk College in Electronic Music Production, Sound Design and Foley plus freelance producer.
Key qualifications: Bronze swimming certificate. 20 years' professional experience as an electronic music producer, drum programmer, recording artist, sample producer and journalist.
What does your job involve? Teaching electronic music production techniques to young aspiring producers and artists whilst watching their skills develop and improve. Oh, and making all sorts of strange sounds, often electronically.
How did you get into your current role? I have 20 years' experience in the music industry specialising in all forms of electronic music, sampling, drum programming and synthesis. When it was decided to create a specific electronic music production course, I was approached to help plan it and to deliver some of the sessions
What did you want to be when you were younger? Taller
What do you do outside work? I continue to work part time in the music industry, I'm a self-taught silversmith who occasionally tetters into sculpture and I make electronic instruments and noise, lots and lots of noise.
Photo of Andy Guy
Andy: Thanks for watching our video! Did you realise how much physics plays into creation and production of music? We have had some questions submitted relating to this topic in the lead up to British Science Week which are answered below. However, if you have any questions, we'd love to hear from you. Please email stemexpert@bt.com.
Questions and answers
Question:
How does this work with bands that have multiple instruments at the same time, e.g. multiple drummers, guitarists, etc.
student profile
Photo of Andy Guy
Answer:
All of those instruments are putting out loud sounds in different parts of the stage. The combined sound on stage is what we call "stage noise" and can sometimes make it difficult for the band to hear each other. Quality wedge monitors that are well-placed help with this but the best option for the band is to use in-ear monitors which are basically high-quality ear bud headphones that are custom moulded. These will minimise or even eliminate the stage noise and preserve the musician's hearing. For the audience, the multiple instruments do not pose a problem because the mics are placed almost touching the instrument before they contribute to the stage noise and that is the sound that is then amplified several thousand watts to be far louder than the stage and so the audience can only hear a clear and controlled mix.
Question:
Does this change when an artist moves around the stage?
student profile
Photo of Andy Guy
Answer:
From the audience point of view there is little change when an artist moves around on the stage. The guitar or bass amps which are stationary of course have the microphones on them so that sound doesn't change. A vocalist who moves around may produce some change in sound because if they stand close to another loud instrument then the vocal mic will pick up part of that. The biggest change though is from the artist's perspective. As they move about the stage they move in and out of the sound projection path from the wedge monitors and their guitar or bass amplifiers so the clarity and/or tone of the mix can change for them. If they move further away from the drums, then the beat could be a bit obscure to them and they could go out of time with their band.
Got a question? email stemexpert@bt.com
6 - Final thoughts from our hosts
Day 4: Drones >